How a physical job can lead to a slow-growing but serious injury
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How a physical job can lead to a slow-growing but serious injury

| Nov 17, 2020 | workplace accidents |

Working a physically demanding job can be very rewarding. You can see the results of your efforts, and you probably rest well after a day of expending physical energy. Unfortunately, whether you work in a factory putting parts together or as a luggage handler for an airline, the work that you do probably requires the same motions over and over again.

Even if there isn’t a single, traumatic incident that leaves you hurt, the work that you do could eventually damage your body. Repetitive stress injuries can not only cause pain and worsening physical symptoms but can also potentially end your blue-collar career without the right treatment and accommodations.

Repetitive motion injuries usually require care and time off work

If you get hurt at work by doing the same thing repeatedly, your body isn’t going to be able to heal itself unless you give it a chance to recover. It is usually necessary to take several weeks off of work in order to let your body heal and then to ask for altered job responsibilities when you do go back so that you don’t immediately aggravate your injury by performing the same motions as before.

You may also need surgery, physical therapy or other treatments to recover fully. Your care can be quite expensive if you attempt to pay for them on your own or with standard health insurance.

 Workers’ compensation does cover repetitive motion injuries

You don’t have to have an incident report to qualify for workers’ compensation benefits. Cumulative injuries, like repetitive motion injuries, as well as occupational illnesses, qualify for medical and disability benefits.

You can potentially receive a portion of your wages while you recover and full coverage for necessary medical care. You simply have to be willing to ask for help and to seek the benefits that will help you recover.